The Gatekeeper's Collective (TGC)

IGNITING THE POWER OF BLACK SAME GENDER LOVE

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Topic For Friday, November 7th, 2014:
The Gatekeeper's Collective (TGC) 1st Anniversary Invite


Brothers & Sisters, Come Celebrate a Magical Milestone!

It has been one whole year since we stepped out in the spirit of self-determination and hope to become The Gatekeepers Collective (TGC).

Join us on Friday, November 7 at 8 PM, at JMG’s safe space for a special evening in which the TGC elements of ritual, advancement strategies, tributes, music, food, and dance will be held up, celebrated and commemorated – as we take a moment to acknowledge the beauty and simplicity of a collective of SGL men and women who have spent the last year building circles of support, learning and collective growth. 


JMG's Safe Space
730 Riverside Drive (@ 150th Street)
Suite 9E
Harlem, New York City
8:00 PM


TRAVEL DIRECTIONS:
TAKE THE #1 TRAIN TO 145TH STREET STATION
OR THE M4, M5, M100 OR M101 BUS TO
149TH STREET & BROADWAY

BROTHERS ARE ASKED TO BRING A POTLUCK DISH AND / OR BEVERAGE

SUMMARY: Financial Freedom & CALL ME KUCHU Film Screening


During the most recent Gatekeeper’s Collective caucus, participants took a tour through what most proposed were new perspectives in financial literacy, and viewed the film, CALL ME KUCHU.  The Phoenix Group’s Wilson Prunier and Tammy lead TGC through a fast-paced seminar exploring 27 ways to build wealth and protect our families.  Among insights included a breakdown of American wealth distribution and concrete strategies for acquiring capital no matter where one is on the wealth totem.

CALL ME KUCHU is the 2012 documentary film exploring the human rights struggles of SGL/LGBT Ugandans against a rabidly anti-homosexual lobby.
  
Among considerations taken up by viewers following the screening included:

Where did the anti-homosexual attitudes come from?

“Religious Christians.”

“Two places…Colonial Britain and reintroduced by [American] right wing evangelicals who fear they’ve lost the cultural wars here…”


Why are the laws against homosexuality so extreme?

“If you can divide a group of people, then it’s easy for them to come in and take over your country…A constant undermining of a people and a country…And once you do that, you can come in and extract their resources…[the anti-homosexual campaign is] a distraction…[It] distracts people from what’s really going on…”

“[The laws are so extreme] to prevent people from being able to gain more rights…In our country they used the Sodomy Laws…But, we’re not so extreme, so that people could congregate and fight for their rights…”

“Fear, loss of control…I visited my father down South…[He’s a member of] a Haitian Creole church…can’t take those people…A woman running for office came in and spoke out against gays who were moving in[to the community]…We challenged her…I said, “You don’t know who’s here who might [be gay]…You don’t know how people love…[Moreover, gay people] move in and increase the value of their neighborhoods…”

“It shows how some groups allow other people to indoctrinate them…Part of the fear goes back to [colonialism]…As a group feeling disempowered…so that, when somebody comes to you with this BS, you don’t even know that religion has been used many times to [manipulate people]…You think this is gonna’ uplift you…You don’t even know what your human value is…”


What, if anything, does their struggle have to do with us?

“The world is a lot smaller than it has ever been…Technology allows us to see what’s going on in a second…What affects one part of the world affects [all parts]…Such as Ebola, HIV…That homophobic attitude can be spread…”

“When I look at the three main religions, Islam, Christianity and Judaism, [there is] a constant battle with one religion fighting for supremacy over the others…”

“Are Black people here so different than in Africa?...We reflect just enough law to show [up] for protection of homosexuals…”

“There are places in Africa pre-dating [Western] colonization that had laws against homosexuality when Islam took over…From Egypt to South Africa, these cultures had no anti-homosexual laws in place…When people fail to practice reasoning [they can be bamboozled]…”

“People are being confused over there…Converted…They don’t have their old ways to fall back on…They’re being given [material resources]…”

“I think about my Brothers, but there comes a time when I gotta’ think about myself…You have to understand the system in order to be able to flip it…”

The Gatekeeper

The Gatekeeper

The Gatekeeper's Collective Venue



FIRST FRIDAYS
EVERY MONTH
730 RIVERSIDE DRIVE
(@ 150TH STREET)
SUITE 9E
HARLEM, NEW YORK CITY
8:00 PM

TRAVEL DIRECTIONS:
TAKE THE #1 TRAIN TO
145TH STREET STATION
OR THE
M4, M5, M100 OR M101 TO
149TH STREET & BROADWAY
GOOGLE MAPS

BROTHERS ARE ASKED
TO BRING A POTLUCK
DISH AND / OR BEVERAGE

Contact Us

thegatekeeperscollective@gmail.com

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